NeurOptics | Evaluation of the portable infrared pupillometer
pupil, pupil exam, pupil examination, pupil pressure measurement, pupil reaction, pupillary, pupillary light reflex, pupillometer, pupillometry, stroke, TBI, trauma, constriction velocity, critical care, critical care nursing, intraocular pressure, modified rankin scale, neurocritical care, neurologist, neuroscience nursing, neurosurgeon, medical devices, NIH Stroke Scoring Scale, NIHSS, ophth, ophthalmic, ophthalmic surgery, ophthalmologist, ophthalmology, opthal, optometrist to ophthalmologist, PERL
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Evaluation of the portable infrared pupillometer

Evaluation of the portable infrared pupillometer

 

Category: Critical Care

 

Du RMeeker MBacchetti PLarson MDHolland MCManley GT., Evaluation of the portable infrared pupillometer., Neurosurgery. 2005 Jul;57(1):198-203; discussion 198-203.

 

There are two different components to the inaccuracies in manual pupillary measurements.  One is the interexaminer consistency, and the other is the precision of measurement.  The interexaminer inconsistency makes it difficult to detect early or small changes.  The pupillometer serves as a quantitative standard that solves both problems.  Because it is a mechanical measurement, there is minimal interexaminer variability and higher sensitivity in detecting pupillary reaction.  Thus, the pupillometer may be a useful tool in future studies that use the pupillary examination to predict clinical outcomes or radiological findings.