NeurOptics | Clinical implications of quantitative infrared pupillometry in neurosurgical patients.
pupil, pupil exam, pupil examination, pupil pressure measurement, pupil reaction, pupillary, pupillary light reflex, pupillometer, pupillometry, stroke, TBI, trauma, constriction velocity, critical care, critical care nursing, intraocular pressure, modified rankin scale, neurocritical care, neurologist, neuroscience nursing, neurosurgeon, medical devices, NIH Stroke Scoring Scale, NIHSS, ophth, ophthalmic, ophthalmic surgery, ophthalmologist, ophthalmology, opthal, optometrist to ophthalmologist, PERL
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Clinical implications of quantitative infrared pupillometry in neurosurgical patients.

Clinical implications of quantitative infrared pupillometry in neurosurgical patients.

 

Category: Critical Care

 

Fountas KN1Kapsalaki EZ, Machinis TGBoev ANRobinson JSTroup EC., Clinical implications of quantitative infrared pupillometry in neurosurgical patients., Neurocrit Care. 2006;5(1):55-60.

 

Abstract

Pupillometry has been widely employed in the evaluation of a large number of pathological conditions, including intracranial pathology. The recent introduction of a portable, user-friendly, infrared pupillometer (ForSite, NeurOptics Inc., Irvine, CA) has enabled the accurate and reproducible measurement of several pupillary parameters, such as maximum and minimum apertures, constriction and dilation velocities, and latency period. It should be noted that various clinical conditions, especially neurological and ocular diseases, as well as numerous medications, may interfere with the measurements. Furthermore, a number of physiological parameters, such as the intensity of retinal illumination, the level of patient’s alertness, the intensity of ambient light, as well as the time of day that the examination is performed may alter the obtained values. The potential implications of pupillometry in the clinical assessment of neurosurgical patients, including its complex relationship to intracranial pressure changes, mandate the undertaking of prospective clinical studies validating the clinical significance of this noninvasive, diagnostic modality.